#102: Proactive Inclusivity (Carl Moore) [PODCAST]

On today’s episode, Dr. Carl Moore and I have a dialog about proactive inclusivity.

Proactive Inclusivity

Guest: Dr. Carl Moore

Dr. Moore is currently an Associate Professor and Director of the Research Academy for Integrated Learning (RAIL) at University of DC. Prior to his current role he served as an adjunct assistant professor in the College of Education as well as the Director of the Teaching and Learning Center at Temple University. More

Quotes

There are stages in which a person can honestly, truly feel [colorblind], but I do think that there is something to be said about honoring and respecting differences.
—Carl Moore

I have a strong sense of ethnic identity, but also a strong sense of identity of the mainstream majority, [as] an American.
—Carl Moore

Recommendations

Bonni:

Carl:

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Going public with our learning

My mind is still invigorated from my conversation about public sphere pedagogy with Thia Wolf on episode 101 of the Teaching in Higher Ed podcast.

Something special happens when we have our students take their work public in some way.

Whether I reflect on this past semester’s experiments with poster sessions in my Consumer Behavior classes, or when my sales students role played a complex sale with someone they hadn’t met before, the excitement of what these learning opportunities present energizes me.

My students were so engaged with the idea that their work could take on a more significant role than an exchange solely with me through the grading process.

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The most fertile ground for significant learning experiences takes place within multiple disciplines.

Our educational system seems to be starting to figure this out at the preschool level, but I rarely see examples like this in higher ed. Our son’s preschool writes about their curriculum this way:

Learning in preschool is hands-on and integrated. A child’s time outside chasing insects in the garden, for instance incorporates all the ‘dispositions for learning’ as well as cognitive development: science (“What kind of bug is this?” “What do they eat?”); math (“Is it larger or smaller than the other one?” “How many did you find today?”); language (“Monarch Butterflies are orange and black.” “Let’s make up a poem about butterflies!”); social skills (“How can we all see?” “You can have a turn next.”); physical development (running after the butterfly, carefully stepping around plants, manipulating the butterfly net); and creative (painting a picture of the butterfly in its habitat. Dancing and moving like one.)

There is no “math time,” “science time,” or “language time.” Learning is everywhere and happening all the time supported by teachers skilled at looking for and creating moments of discovery and learning based on children’s needs and interests.

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I wish there was more of a push to have this paradigm in higher ed.

When we think of our students as producers of knowledge, the vision of higher education is magnified.

I recently came across the theme of Vanderbilt’s Course Design Institute and was trying to figure out if there was a way I could attend, even though the application deadline has passed (oh yeah – and I don’t work there).

Their site explain the Students as Producers theme as follows:

“Students as Producers” is shorthand for an approach to teaching that helps students become not just consumers of information, but also producers of knowledge, engaging in meaningful, generative work in the courses they take.

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Question: Were you inspired by something that Thia Wolf shared about public sphere pedagogy, or have you tried something similar in your teaching? You can leave a comment by clicking here.

#101: Public sphere pedagogy (Thia Wolf) [PODCAST]

On this week’s episode, Dr. Thia Wolf shares about public sphere pedagogy.

Thia Wolf

Guest: Thia Wolf

Thia is a Professor of English and Director of the First-Year Experience Program at California State University, Chico, where she has worked since 1989. Prior to her appointment in the FYE program, she coordinated a variety of writing programs, including the first-year composition program and the writing across the disciplines program.  Since 2006, she has been collaborating with faculty in several disciplines to embed public dimensions in first-year classes. Her publications have focused on collaborative learning and on public sphere pedagogy. More

Quotes

Students need to have an experience when they come to college that … gives them a sense that education is for the rest of their lives, it’s to help them do things in the world.
—Thia Wolf

I noticed that the curriculum of first year students looks a lot like the curriculum in high school … I would say that it sends the “Not ready for prime time” message.
—Thia Wolf

When [students] go public with their work, they have to stand by it, and really remarkable things happen.
—Thia Wolf

We don’t give students opportunities to experience and reflect on how the curriculum is part of them and how they are affecting it.
—Thia Wolf

Resources

Recommendations

Bonni

Thia

  • Have students tell their stories about themselves in our classes, the story of “what it means to be me in this class.”

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#100: The failure episode [PODCAST]

Today on Teaching in Higher Ed’s 100th episode, Dave and I celebrate this milestone by talking about failure.

failure

CV of Failures

Quotes

At the time, I felt like I had to know everything in order to be a good teacher, so instead of admitting that I didn’t know the answer to the student’s question, I dismissed it.
—Cameron Hunt-McNabb

I think I understand way better now what kinds of issues my students think are important.
—Doug McKee

I strongly identified with that strain of perfectionism that insists that unless every student in every class feels like every moment was a rich and profound learning experience, then I have failed.
—Jeff Hittenberger

Guest Stories

1) Katie Linder

2) Jeff Hittenberger

  • Felt like he had failed at the end of each semester.

3.) Angela Jenks

  • Didn’t know how much the class textbooks cost.

4.) Josh Eyler

5.) Michelle Miller

  • Didn’t take care of a problem before it escalated.

6.) James Lang

  • Was not clear enough in assignment criteria.

7.) Cameron Hunt-McNabb

  • Thought she had to know everything to be good teacher.

7.) Maha Bali

  • Laughed at student’s suffering … almost.

8.) Doug McKee

Recommendations

Books:

Janine Utell: Dear Committee Members* by Julie Schumacher

José Bowen: Teaching Naked* by José Bowen

Sean Micael Morris: Savvy* by Ingrid Law

Cameron Hunt McNabb: Tina Fey’s advice to “Say yes” in her memoir, Bossy Pants*

Amy Collier: Quotes Anne Lamott: “These are the words I want on my gravestone: that I was a helper, and that I danced,” from her book Grace (Eventually)*

Tools:

Doug McKee: Piazza*

Aaron Daniel Annas: Amazon Echo*

Teaching inspiration:

Rebecca Campbell: Be kind to students. Don’t make assumptions.

Linda Nielsen: Cultivate your courage by trying out things you’re afraid of.

Lee Skallerup Bessette: Be hopeful. Be optimistic. And give your students the benefit of the doubt right from the start.

Doug McKee: Try poster sessions with students.

Peter Newbury: Get yourself into a learning community. Get on Twitter.

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#099: Encouraging Accountability (Angela Jenks) [PODCAST]

Dr. Angela Jenks shares about her experiences encouraging accountability in her students on today’s episode of the Teaching in Higher Ed podcast.

encouraging accountability

Guest: Angela Jenks

Angela is a medical anthropologist and Lecturer, PSOE (Tenure-Track Teaching Faculty) in the Department of Anthropology at the University of California, Irvine, where she also directs the M.A. in Medicine, Science, and Technology Studies program.

Quotes

It’s not necessarily a kindness to not fulfill the requirements of the class.
—Angela Jenks

One of the challenges is holding standards while not turning the classroom into an adversarial situation.
—Angela Jenks

One of the things I focus on increasingly is very clear policies.
—Angela Jenks

I didn’t want the syllabus to turn into something that reads like a Terms of Service.
—Angela Jenks

Mentioned in Episode

Podcast episodes on kindness:

Podcast episode on Attitude:

Recommendations

Bonni recommends:

Allowing students to “show up.” Consider this quote from Anne Lamott (who was mentioned on Episode 070 with Amy Collier):

I had a session over the phone with my therapist today. I have these secret pangs of shame about being single, like I wasn’t good enough to get a husband. Rita reminded me of something I’d told her once, about the five rules of the world as arrived at by this Catholic priest named Tom Weston.

The first rule, he says, is that you must not have anything wrong with you or anything different.

The second one is that if you do have something wrong with you, you must get over it as soon as possible.

The third rule is that if you can’t get over it, you must pretend that you have.

The fourth rule is that if you can’t even pretend that you have, you shouldn’t show up. You should stay home, because it’s hard for everyone else to have you around.

And the fifth rule is that if you are going to insist on showing up, you should at least have the decency to feel ashamed.

So Rita and I decided that the most subversive, revolutionary thing I could do was to show up for my life and not be ashamed.

—Anne Lamott

Angela recommends:

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